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These Mesmerizing aerial photos reveal Hong Kong’s ‘hidden geometries’ (PHOTOS)

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Architect and photographer Tugo Cheng wants to transform the way we see Hong Kong.

In
the photography series “City Patterns” he captures the city from above,
replacing signature shots of skyscrapers with the lines and patterns of
his eye-catching aerial images.
“People
from overseas think Hong Kong is about high density and high-rise
buildings,” Cheng said. “But I wanted to reveal the hidden geometries in
the city.”
Kowloon Tong's luxurious housing units.

A bird’s-eye view

Having
grown up in Hong Kong, Cheng knows his subject matter intimately. An
architect by training, he started using drones to photograph his vision
of a city where leisure, industry and infrastructure collide. As well as
shooting downtown areas, Cheng turned his lens toward Hong Kong’s
countryside, as well as rarely seen spots like cemeteries, sewage
treatment plants and power stations.
“At
eye-level, Hong Kong is really quite different from what we
(architects) draw — and from what you see with a bird’s-eye view,”
Cheng said.
“You have to give up
your preconceptions. From above, a beautiful place can be boring and a
boring place can be very interesting.”
These sewage treatment plants, when viewed from above, resemble giant Ferris wheels.

In
his photo “Intersection,” Cheng depicts the city’s sophisticated
transport network as a series of railway tracks intersecting with a
flyover. “Ferris wheel” portrays circular sewage treatment plants that,
when seen from above, resemble a fairground. And “Heatwave” captures a
more “relaxed” side of Hong Kong, with multicolored parasols making one
of the city’s beaches look like a pin board.
But shooting creatively from above is no easy feat.
When
Cheng started experimenting with aerial photography in 2014, he would
mount a GoPro on a drone and snap pictures every five seconds. Now,
advances in technology mean that he can choose when to shoot in real
time, letting him experiment with light and composition.
The beaches in southern Hong Kong are popular weekend destinations.

“When
you’re taking normal photographs, you’re (capturing) the side
elevations of buildings and objects,” Cheng explained. “But when you’re
looking down vertically onto a building, you’re taking a planner’s view.
So the direction of light and shadows is really important because it
gives a three-dimensional feel.”

A new perspective

To
offer a sense of scale, Cheng often includes familiar sights — like
cars, buses or umbrellas — in his images. In “Six Feet Under,” for
instance, a small red car stands out from the cemetery’s green
topography. As well as juxtaposing the living and the dead, it attracts
the viewer’s eye and puts the individual tombstone plots into scale.
An aerial shot of one of Hong Kong's cementaries.

These
playful additions also help familiarize landscapes that can be
difficult to identify from above. Cheng recalled a colleague being
unable to recognize an aerial picture of her own neighborhood.
“It’s
because her perspective was different,” Cheng said. “Ultimately, I want
to surprise people and trigger them to think beyond the photo.”
Throughout
the “City Patterns” series, Cheng strives to convey what makes his city
unique. He has shot similar projects in places far afield as Ethiopia,
China and the US, but what interests him about Hong Kong — infamous for
its expensive real estate and dense population — is how entangled the
city is with nature.
“In
some countries, when you go to the countryside, you need to travel a
long distance and you see a clear transition from city to suburb, then
countryside,” explained Cheng, whose “Six Feet Above” photo, captures
the boundary between a large-scale residential development and a
collection of fishing ponds. “Hong Kong is very small and compact, so we
don’t have that transition.”
“I’ve
been to many countries and one of the differences between Hong Kong
(and other places) is how the developed and undeveloped land are very
close to each other,” Cheng said. “I think this is something we need to
treasure.”
 
From above, Hong Kong's shipping containers resemble Legos.City Patterns Coastline

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Ike Ani is a Freelance writer whose quest constantly is to relate happenings around the world to human daily living. He's also a song writer and singer, Acoustic Guitarist, and Teacher.

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Lifestyle

L. A Prisoners Infect Themselves With Coronavirus To Get Early Release (VIDEO)

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A group of silly L.A area prison inmates were very eager to contract the dreaded coronavirus .

They attempted this because they believed that would trigger their ticket out of prison.

According to the L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva who made the startling revelation Monday, said about twenty-four (24) inmates at the Pitchess Detention Center in Castaic attempted (and somewhat succeeded, apparently) to infect themselves way back in mid-April 2020.

The Sheriff revealed that their department saw an increase in spike in confirmed cases out of nowhere.

He said that when they investigated, they found a high number of inmates living in one block of the prison appeared to be deliberately trying to infect each other with COVID-19 any way they could from behind bars.

When Alex Villanueva played the surveillance footages he and his team combed through carefully , and it showed several inmates hanging out in a common area and passing around what Alex described as a hot cup of water, as well as one face mask they’d each put on all in hopes of getting sympathy from a judge to spring them from the facility and let them go home.

But it turns out, their little ploy worked but, only halfway.

Villanueva reported that 21 of the inmates (out of 50 in the block) caught the ‘Coronavirus.

“What they won’t catch is a break” said the Sheriff.

Watch the Video HERE

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COVID-19 LOCKDOWN: 12 Year Old Albino Girl Suffers Eye Problems After Hawking Veggies In Abuja (PHOTOS)

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A very sad Facebook post greeted Nigerians from Abuja showing a 12 year old Albino Girl Grace, who started developing sight problems after Hawking Veggies under the scorching sun in Abuja.

The Facebook post stated that the little girl was asked to hawk the veggies by her aunt whom she lives with.

Below are the Screenshots of the Facebook post:

This sad news has sparked an outrage by well meaning individuals who spoke against such cruelty and insensitivity of the said girl’s aunt.

what do you think of this? Drop your comments below.

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“Buhari is Made In London” – Reno Omokri Blasts Presidency On Nigerian Made Products

The Buhari administration has been known for enforcing the Nigerian people to patronize Nigerian made goods though without much strategy to make life easier while this transition to economic growth is enforced.

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Reno Omokri Nuggets

The Buhari administration has been known for enforcing the Nigerian people to patronize Nigerian made goods though without much strategy to make life easier while this transition to economic growth is enforced. Many Nigerians have tagged it a harsh move that is insensitive and inhumane but moreso, Reno Omokri has singled out signals of hypocrisy in the President of Nigeria by outlining certain traits of family moves of the President that shows that he(Buhari) as the No.1 citizen has no regards for anything made in Nigeria but yet wants other Nigerians to embrace Nigerian made goods.

Reno Omokri ‘s tweet reads:

His kids schooled in England. His wife just returned from a 3 month UK stay. His daughter gave birth to his grandchild in Spain (made in Spain), yet
@MBuhari
, who is London, wants us to patronise made in Nigeria!

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